Great Career is Better than Good Resume | Karen Dillon - Product Mindset

DYT 113: Great Career is Better than Good Resume | Karen Dillon

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great careerIn this Topical Zoom episode, I speak with Karen Dillon, former editor of Harvard Business Review, Inc. Magazine, co-author of Wall Street Journal best-seller Competing Against Luck with Clayton Christensen about applying Jobs To Be Done for a great career.

Who is Karen Dillon?

Karen Dillon is the Co-author of Wall Street Journal best-seller Competing Against Luck: the Story of Innovation and Customer Choice, with Clayton Christensen. Co-author of New York Times best-seller How Will You Measure Your Life also with Clayton Christensen, and author of the Harvard Business Review Guide to Office Politics. Former editor of Harvard Business Review, Inc. magazine, Legal Business magazine, and The American Lawyer. Global Ambassador for the Legal 500. Named one of the world’s most influential women as part of Ashoka’s ChangemakeHers inaugural list in 2011. A 2016 ”Top Influencer”, Product Management Year in Review.

What you will learn – Great career, Personal Jobs to Be Done and more!

In this episode, Karen talks about how we as product makers can measure our lives (which we discover has a connection with Jobs To Be Done too). She goes on to talk about mistakes high-achievers make in building a good resume, often at the cost of a great career. She also helps us get stated with Jobs To Be Done. (I refer to this article in this episode: Getting To Why)

Continued from Episode 112.

  1. You talk about “Finding happiness in your career” in your book How Will You Measure Your Life. How can we find out what makes us tick?
  2. I’ve used the Jobs To Be Done theory in finding more about my target audience, so as to build the right kind of offerings as a product maker. What other ways are companies and businesses using the Jobs Theory?
  3. What are some of the biggest mistakes companies do when it comes to making products and services?
    • What makes tools great is the way people use them. Have you found the Jobs Theory being used sub-optimally?
  4. How have the best companies, in your research, put the Jobs To Be Done theory to practice?
  5. Let’s now assume that we built a product or a service using the Jobs To Be Done theory. How do I actually close the loop and make those products or services get “hired” by prospective customers?
  6. If a product organization is looking to “hire” the Jobs To Be Done theory to innovate, where do they get started?

Useful Links

Getting Started & Resources

  • Tiny Book Of Triggers for actionable triggers to learn fresh new Product Management & Design skills & more. (click here to download)
  • Get Started with Design Your Thinking (click here)
  • Handpicked Resources (click here)
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